Beginner to Advanced Techniques for speaking with Deities


God Talk

Speaking with the Gods

When I was just a kid, I remember my Grandma keeping various candles about the house that she used for different purposes. One was in the shape of a five-pointed star and was green. This was her money candle. These early memories must have influenced me because I’ve always been attracted to candle magic. I enjoy the choice of color, scent, and shape. When developing my own rituals for communicating with deities, candles were a natural choice.

Jay’s Starting Technique

The first step is to choose an entity that you wish to speak with. It can be a God, Goddess, or nature spirit. I won’t go into communicating with the spirits of deceased humans in this article. Once you have selected your subject of interest, do some research on them. Find their associated symbols, read and familiarize yourself with stories about them, even look for related art. Really get familiar with them, and get your mind tuned to their essence.

For this technique we’ll use a slightly ritualistic approach with candle magic. Find a candle that you feel represents the deity you are going to communicate with. Try and find a color, smell, shape or size that reminds you of the deity’s attributes. For instance, I think of Manannan as a storm god, so I chose a black candle that had a very masculine and mysterious scent to it. The shape didn’t matter to me as much and so I chose something practical, but it can be helpful symbolism to chose a 3-sided candle for communicating with a triple-aspect goddess and so forth.

Once you have the candle, it’s good to add some personal touches to its appearance to give it more importance. This can be done by carving a symbol representing the god or goddess into the candle. If you are unsure what symbol to use, there are plenty of books that cover this topic, or you can try searching for information on the internet. If the deity correlates with one of the planets, you can use the astrological symbol. 0e59e842b813d62cab15bc978cf574ee--astrological-symbols-astrology-symbolsIn addition to symbols, you can attach plants and herbs or surround the candle’s base in a wreath of them. A decorative holder can also be used, such as a shining gold base for a sun god, a shallow bowl filled with water for those water related, and the same for Stones, earth, feathers, you name it! Make the candle special with whatever feels right to you and has a strong personalized connection to the spirit you want to speak with.

 

With the candle prepared, the next step is to imbue it with the energy of your will and desire. This process can be started while you are working on decorating the candle. Think about what you know of their history, their nature, and what you hope to gain by speaking with them. Feel the energy pouring out of your hands as you work on the candle. Do this at a time when you are feeling an appropriate level of enthusiasm. Give the candle your full focus, making sure distractions don’t take you away from the task. This candle is an expression of your willpower to communicate with a higher entity, and a vessel for your personal energy. It may seem like a lot of work, but this is something you will be using over and over again. I personally feel it lends extra power to the candle the more times you use it.

The second step is to plan a good a time and place to make the connection. For Manannan, since I didn’t live near the ocean at the time, I chose to communicate during a storm. Likewise, working with a moon deity is best in view of the moon at night, and a nature deity could be contacted in the woods. For some situations you’ll have to create your own environment. For fire deities, you could try it in front of a fireplace or in a dark room lit by a lot of small candles. The idea is to make you feel closer to the element of that God/Goddess, and to put you in an appropriately mystical mood. It’s not a requirement that you be near a like element at all, only a suggestion to help increase the conductivity. Of course it is also always sensible to find a place or time you won’t be disturbed during the process.

Once your candle is ready and everything is in place, simply sit there for a while and calm yourself. Get all distracting thoughts out of the way (as much as any human can expect to) and get comfortable. If you want to be in a chair, on the floor, or standing, do it. Go with whatever feels right in this situation. As you light the candle in front of you, say the deity’s name out loud like a mantra. Elongate the syllables and really feel the name. “Maa-naan-naaan” or “Briiih-ghiid” etc. Repeat the name while willing the god or goddess to appear in front of you. Make your will and your call a friendly invitation and a hopeful request for conversation. Some people will see a visual signifier that a presence has entered the room, others will simply sense a shift in the rooms atmosphere. There isn’t one key event used to signify that a deity has arrived. Sometimes they will speak first, other times they will enter and wait to be addressed. I usually sense a building of energy in front of me as the deity enters the room. When this build-up stabilizes is when I attempt to converse.

This is the hardest part to describe, as it may be different depending on the person. When I communicate with a deity or spirit, I often speak out loud. If you choose to speak out loud, also be sure to “think” what you are saying loudly. Make sure that as you are saying the words, you are also thinking of those words and what they mean. As humans we have the amazing ability to speak while thinking of something totally unrelated at the same time. Try to maintain a balance of focus and relaxation. After you speak, immediately clear your mind of thought and listen for an answer. Be patient and be open. Some people receive communication in the form of images, others hear the voice respond in their mind, and some receive mental concepts in return. Feelings and ideas can be as effective as words, and you may want to try communicating with those as well. Likewise if you relate to images stronger than words, try communicating by sending images to the god. Experiment and find the method that works best.

I recommend your first communication with the deity to be an introduction and a statement of purpose. Much like when you approach someone in person, introduce yourself and let them know why you’re talking to them. Tell them about yourself while also expressing interest in who you are speaking to. Maintain a cordial tone and be respectful until you know who you’re speaking to better. It is very possible to have a casual relationship with a deity but in the beginning I highly recommend keeping things more reserved. After introductions are out of the way, wing it. Respond to what they say or move the conversation toward your goal.

For some people, success will be instant. For others practice is needed. I find that the more times you speak with a spirit or deity the easier it becomes to hear and communicate. Some people become comfortable enough that they can communicate while walking in the woods or while driving to work. There will be days, no matter how often you practice, that your mind is too distracted or nervous, so don’t give up and don’t let failure get you down! The rewards out weigh the effort by tenfold!

Advance Spirit Bonding Technique

Before we begin with the advanced technique, I’d like to say that this is potentially dangerous. In spite of this I feel comfortable publishing it for two reasons: 1. Too many magic and occult books shy away from anything potentially unsafe or risky, which is somewhat dishonest. There are dangers on the astral plane, from immoral magic users in the form of psychic attack, and negative nature elementals. That’s a fact any active occultist will have to face someday. 2. Not everyone is going to be able to apply this technique, as it requires some amount of experience and skill. If a newbie is able to do this, then their natural gift will hopefully help them deal with the results.

This is more than just communicating with a God. It is sharing your physical body; being a host for the deity’s spirit or soul. Making one’s body available to an outside energy is the basis of channeling, and in my experience there are two levels of this process. The most extreme version of channeling has the host completely leave his body so that another entity can inhabit it. This is not only the most dangerous but also the least useful to the experiencer. Classically in this situation a second person is required to interact with the channeled spirit as the body’s true soul is pushed or displaced to a different location during the session. If you were to attempt this on your own, you would remember only fragments at best.

What I am teaching here allows a very temporary coexistence within your body. Your soul still fully inhabits its vessel and the god or goddess overlaps parts of your soul while partially occupying your body. Let me simply go over a typical session’s requirements and events and I’ll expand on this concept as I do. This should of course be done with an entity you have communicated with frequently and one with which you share a close bond of trust.

I strongly advise doing the advanced communication technique in a well shielded area that you have done magic in previously. Be at your most comfortable and secluded. Ask anyone in your home not to disturb you no matter the reason, turn off your phone, etc. Do whatever you usually do to get yourself into a trance like state. (Incense, dark room, music, whatever.) Call the deity you wish to attempt this with as you always do. You of course want to discuss this idea with the god or spirit as they may be unwilling or unable. I only say unable because of the large range in spirit or deity type, although I believe most all types are capable of this. Once the event is agreed upon, a shift in your will is required. This may vary depending on the type of psychic self defense you have. If you keep shields around you to keep out all outside energy types, you will of course have to lower these or alter their intention. If you have them you know how to do this. Next, one needs to become fully aware of his or her spiritual energies. Quiet your mind and feel the shape of your astral body and the energy that infuses your physical being. Feel the flow of energy and lightly part it in front of your body as if you were opening a door. Mentally/verbally say: “It is my will that (name) enter and share my body.” If you want to alter this sentence to have preset limitations (such as “..my body for the next 20 minutes”) it is fine of course, although you may want to question why you have a trust issue. Let the deity’s energy flow into you. Don’t feel like you have to react to it, simply let it be. You won’t have to combine your energy with that of the god, they should be able to flow over and around each other without mixing.

The experience at this point will vary depending on who or what you are communicating with. The first thing I always feel is very strong energy flowing into my body. This may be gradual, or it may be very quick. It is the entity merging with your body. Because of the size and strength of most deities, the whole of their essence will not fill your body completely. Only a portion of it will, and the rest will surround your body. My awareness increases dramatically at this point and my perception is very different. Senses like taste, sound, and smell will be most apparently different. An odd combination of divine experience and physical sensations overlap at the same time. Knowledge can be shared very quickly in this mode, although each entity should have control over what knowledge is imparted. The potential at this point is up to you and who you are dealing with. The mutual benefits should be obvious. The energy overflow from having multiple souls in one body, especially one being a deity, is too much to handle for an extended amount of time. If this is the first time you’ve attempted this, you may want to keep it short. Use your own judgment with this. Go by your gut, and if you feel like you should quit or it is getting to be overwhelming, just stop.

The separation process for me has always been a communication to the deity that it is time to stop and the energies have always willfully been withdrawn. Another reason to only do this with a trusted entity that you have worked with many, many times before. Re-shield yourself as necessary. You should find yourself feeling very energetic when this experience is over.

Question and Answer section:

Q. I’m hearing a response when I try to communicate, but how do I know that it’s not me answering my own questions? -or- Are the voices in my head coming from the inside or the outside?

A. Sometimes we question if the conversation we’re hearing is self created. For me it often feels too strong and different from my own thoughts to be doubted. Other times it may seem too much like, and may even be, inner dialog. You’ll reach a point where you’ll know you are speaking to someone else because you’ll learn things you didn’t already know, and get answers to your question that you never would have expected. Sometimes you want to hear an answer so badly your inner-self offers up an answer and blocks out the deity. This is normal. Just clear your mind, take a deep breath, and sharpen your focus. I think a healthy dose of skepticism is great, but a friend of mine advises to simply not worry too much about it and press on. With practice you’ll know for sure.

Other times our inner-voice offers up an answer because it should be listened to. More than once, while asking for advice, I have found that I already knew the answer before the question was finished. This is good too, and shows us in our busy world how little we take time out to quietly do some soul searching.

Q. I’ve tried speaking with (insert deity name here) many times now and never with any success. What am I doing wrong?

A. You may want to try a different technique than mine, or change any technique so that it works better for you personally. Also, you may want to attempt speaking with a different deity. You will find you have better connections with some more than others because of their nature and your own. Just like people in your work place and in your family, it’s simply easier to talk to some people than others.

Some deities are also more person friendly than others. Some don’t feel the need to communicate with humans, or are very selective. Most seem to enjoy it, and welcome the opportunity. You may want to make sure you are making your attempt with respect. Commanding a god or goddess to appear isn’t very effective or cool.

Q. Isn’t speaking to God or whatever a sign of insanity?

A. Ah yes, this classic idea springs from stories of mad bombers and murderers who were commanded by God to commit such heinous acts. My first response is to point out that even if someone told you to kidnap a bus full of nuns, you’d have to be really nuts to simply say: “Okay. Sure, I’ll get right on that.”

Aside from that, no it doesn’t mean you’re crazy. Pagans, Hindus, some Christian groups, and many other religions have some sort of way to communicate with god.

A pinch of skepticism is good, so if you hear something scary or crazy, by all means dismiss it. If the whole topic makes you too uncomfortable, simply don’t do it. If it makes you feel better, they say that really insane people are too crazy to question their own sanity.

Copyright © 2002 by Jay Bell / Temple of Manannan Mac LirVisit the Original Article

The Jinn – Islamic Demons and Spirits


This is a great article done by Metal-Gaia. She’s got more awesome goodies for you, and not just mysticism. Follow her and please leave any comments and likes on her original article linked at the bottom of the page. She did all the work and deserves all the praise!

Original post May 31, 2017

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Since we’re in the Muslim’s holy month of Ramadan, I thought it might be interesting to do something different on my blog and cover a Muslim topic. Specifically, I’d like to discuss interesting creatures I read about in the Quran called Jinn.

In the West most of us know about Jinn as genies from movies like Aladdin. But many people don’t know the complete story.

In Christianity, there are Angels, Humans and Demons. But in Islam, there are Angels, Humans and Jinn.

“Indeed We created man from dried clay of black smooth mud.  And We created the Jinn before that from the smokeless flame of fire” (Quran 15:26-27)

“The Angels were created from light and the Jinn from smokeless fire.” (Saheeh Muslim)

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Jinn are not directly analogous to the Christian concept of a demon. Where demons are all evil, the Jinn have free will (just like people). So Jinn can decide whether they want to be good or bad. Most are mischievous because of their fiery nature, but there are a small number of good Jinn. According to Islamic doctrine, the good Jinn are the ones who converted to Islam. Angels, on the other hand, have no free will.

Jinn have their own lives, just as humans do. They can get married, have families, get divorced, so on and so forth. But they are invisible and live in a sort of parallel world, or alternative dimension. They also have much longer lifespans than humans do.

Jinn is an Arabic collective noun deriving from the Semitic root jnn (Arabic: جَنّ / جُنّ‎‎, jann), whose primary meaning is “to hide”.  Thus, they are physically invisible from man as their description suggests.

Like humans, the Jinn too are required to worship God and follow Islam.  Their purpose in life is exactly the same as ours.

“I did not create the Jinn and mankind except to worship Me.” (Quran 51:56)

The Quran even discusses a group of Jinn who liked the Quran and decided to become Muslims.

“Say (O’ Muhammed): It has been revealed to me that a group of Jinn listened and said; ‘Indeed we have heard a marvelous Quran.  It guides unto righteousness so we have believed in it, and we will never make partners with our lord’.”(Quran 72:1-2)

So Jinn can be Muslims or non-Muslims. But most of the Jinn are said to be non-muslims. And the army of the most famous Jinn, Satan, is composed of non-believing Jinn. The disbelieving Jinn are also called devils.

Unlike Christianity, Islam maintains that Satan (Lucifer) was from the Jinn and not an angel.  Angels do not have a free will to disobey.

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What clearly distinguishes the Jinn from mankind, are their powers and abilities. God has given them these powers as a test for them.  If they oppress others with them, then they will be held accountable. And the powers of these Jinn are sometimes used to explain the unexplained mysteries in the physical world. Because Jinn are said to have the power to appear as humans, animals trees and anything else.

The ability to possess and take over the minds and bodies of other creatures is also a power that the Jinn are said to have.  This however, is something which has been prohibited to them as it is a great oppression to possess another being. This concept has been popularly depicted in films like the Exorcist.

The Jinn possess people for many reasons.  Sometimes it is because the Jinn or its family has been hurt accidentally.  It could be because the Jinn has fallen in love with the person.  However, most of the time possession occurs because the Jinn is simply malicious and wicked.  According to the Islamic sites I’ve looked at, a person can recite the Quran frequently to prevent this from happening.

“Indeed, Satan flees from the house in which Surah Al-Baqarah (the 2nd chapter of the Quran) is recited.” (Al-Tirmidhi)

This is not all that different from Christian ideas of demon possession, that the best way to exorcise the demon is to read the bible, or recite the Lord’s Prayer, or simply just to say the name of God.

Humans and Jinn can also get married, although that is not typical.


Jinn Before Islam

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Jinn also aren’t isolated to Islamic culture alone. The concept of a Jinn preceded Islam, and was simply incorporated when the religion came about.

The earliest evidence of the word, can be found in Persian, for the singular Jinni is the Avestic “Jaini”, a wicked (female) spirit. Jaini were among various creatures in the possibly even pre-Zoroastrian mythology of peoples of Iran.

The belief in spirits was prominent in pre-Islamic Bedouin religion. However, there is evidence that the word jinn is derived from Aramaic, where it was used by Christians to designate pagan gods reduced to the status of demons, and was introduced into Arabic folklore only late in the pre-Islamic era. So in the same way that European pagan Gods like Pan were personified as demons when Christianity became a central religion, many ancient Middle Eastern spirits of folk-lore became relegated to Jinn once Islam became a dominant religion. However, instead of making all these beings completely evil as Christianity did, it seems that the Jinn —while mainly evil —do have a bit of a more nuanced nature, in that they have free will.


The Different Types of Jinn

Marid  (pronounced MAA–rid)

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Large and imposing, the Marid are considered the most powerful tribe of jinn. They are the classic genies of folklore, often portrayed as barrel-chested men with booming voices.

Marids are mentioned in pre-Islamic Arabian mythology and inside the One Thousand and One Nights alongside the Jinn in the story of The Fisherman and the Jinni. The term marid is still used in Arabic to refer to giants.

Marids are often described as the most powerful type of jinn, having especially great powers. They are the most proud as well. Like every jinn, they have free will yet can be compelled to perform chores. According to folklore, they also have the ability to grant wishes to mortals, but that usually requires battle, imprisonment, rituals, or just a great deal of flattery. The Bahamut, the giant fish in the Qu’ran, is an example of a non-humanoid form of this particular Jinn.

This jinn is most familiar to the Western Stereotypical view of the Jinn, as muscular creatures imprisoned in magic lamps compelled to grant human wishes.

Ghoul

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The ghoul are shape-shifting, cannibalistic, and blood-drinking creatures that feed on the flesh of human beings (a sort of vampire zombie?).

The oldest references to ghul in Arabian lore are found in The Book of 1001 Nights. There are several types of ghoul. The most feared is a female type (ghula) which has the ability to appear as a normal, mortal woman. According to lore, such a creature marries an unsuspecting man, who becomes her prey.

The ghoul are nocturnal creatures who inhabit graveyards, ruins and other lonely places. Sometimes they are described as dead humans who sleep for long periods in secret graves, then awake, rise and feast on both the living and the dead. Ghoul also personify the unknown terrors held by the desert.

In Persian lore the ghoul has the legs of a donkey and the horns of a goat.

Hinn

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The hinn are jinn, close to animals, and they especially like to appear as dogs.
In Miraculous Aspects of Things Existing (Arabic – كتاب عجائب المخلوقات وغرائب الموجودات), or The Book of Jinn, Zakarīyā’ ibn Muḥammad al-Qazwīnī claimed to have sighted these creatures in Arabia, Persia, and India. The book contains several pages dedicated to this particular Jinn.

Ifrit

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The ‘ifrit (variation: afrit) is cited only once in the Qur’an, in reference to a djinni who fetched the throne of the Queen of Sheba at the command of King Solomon. In lore, the Ifrit is evil and powerful, and difficult to control.

The Ifrits are in a class of infernal Jinn noted for their strength and cunning. An ifrit is an enormous winged creature of fire, either male or female, who lives underground and frequents ruins. Ifrits live in a society structured along ancient Arab tribal lines, complete with kings, tribes and clans. They generally marry one another, but they can also marry humans.

While ordinary weapons and forces have no power over them, they are susceptible to magic, which humans can use to kill them or to capture and enslave them. As with the jinn, an ifrit may be either a believer or an unbeliever, good or evil, but it is most often depicted as a wicked and ruthless being.

Jann

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Jann are shape-shifters who live in the desert, and take the forms of whirlwinds and white camels. They are open-minded about humans, and were among the first Jinn encountered by people. They have the power to hide or reveal oases in the desert, depending on whether they like or dislike a party of travelers. They are the enemies of the ghoul.

Throughout history, the Jann have protected armies they deem as righteous, while impeding those they deem unworthy. The entire course of history is affected when they help a side. As a result, many events vital to Islamic history have been attributed to the Jann.

Nasnas

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The nasnas is a weak form of a Jinn-Human hybrid.

It is described in The Book of 1001 Nights as a half- human being. It has half a head, half a body, one arm, one leg. It hops about on its single leg.

Also, in Somali folklore there is a creature called “xunguruuf” “Hungruf” which resembles the “nasnās” as it has the same characteristics and features. It’s believed it can kill a person by just touching them and the person would be fleshless in mere seconds.

Palis

The palis is a vampiric foot-licker that lives in the desert. It has low intelligence and can be easily outwitted, according to lore. It attacks sleeping people and drains their blood by licking the soles of their feet. It can be fooled by two people sleeping end to end with their soles of their feet together or under each other’s head.

Shiqq

The shiqq is a lower form of djinn, a half creature,or literally only half-formed and thus monstrous in appearance. Muḥammad al-Qazwīnī included Kabandha, the creature from the Southeast-Asian epic, Ramayana, as a Shiqq Jinn.

Si’lat

The si’lat are expert shape-shifters and the smartest of the djinn. They can mimic human appearance with ease.

Shaitan

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In Islam the Devil is known as Iblīs (Arabic: إبليس‎, plural: ابالسة abālisah) or Shayṭān (Arabic: شيطان‎, plural: شياطين shayāṭīn). In Islam Iblis is a jinn who refused to bow to Adam (ʾĀdam). The primary characteristic of the Devil, besides hubris, is that he has no power other than the power to cast evil suggestions into the hearts of men, women, and jinn. Although the Quran does mention appointing jinn to assist those who are far from God in a general context. “We made the evil ones friends (only) to those without faith.”

The shaitan (shaytan) is a rebellious, malevolent Jinn associated with demonic forces


LINKS

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Jinn: Wikipedia

Wikia Jinn Types

Islam Religion The World of Jinn

Islam Awareness Jinn according to Quran and Sunnah

Original Article

Celtic Fairy Tales #2


Guleesh

By Joseph Jacobs, 1892

THERE was once a boy in the County Mayo; Guleesh was his name. There was the finest rath a little way off from the gable of the house, and he was often in the habit of seating himself on the fine grass bank that was running round it. One night he stood, half leaning against the gable of the house, and looking up into the sky, and watching the beautiful white moon over his head. After he had been standing that way for a couple of hours, he said to himself: ” My bitter grief that I am not gone away out of this place altogether. I’d sooner be any place in the world than here. Och, it’s well for you, white moon,” says he, “that’s turning round, turning round, as you please yourself, and no man can put you back. I wish I was the same as you.”

Hardly was the word out of his mouth when he heard a great noise coming like the sound of many people running together, and talking, and laughing, and making sport, and the sound went by him like a whirl of wind, and he was listening to it going into the rath. “Musha, by my soul,” says he, “but ye’re merry enough, and I’ll follow ye.”

What was in it but the fairy host, though he did not know at first that it was they who were in it, but he followed them into the rath. It’s there he heard the fulparnee, and the folpornee, the rap-lay-hoota, and the roolya-boolya, that they had there, and every man of them crying out as loud as he could: “My horse, and bridle, and saddle! My horse, and bridle, and saddle!”

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“By my hand,” said Guleesh, “my boy, that’s not bad. I’ll imitate ye,” and he cried out as well as they: “My horse, and bridle, and saddle! My horse, and bridle, and saddle!” And on the moment there was a fine horse with a bridle of gold, and a saddle of silver, standing before him. He leaped up on it, and the moment he was on its back he saw clearly that the rath was full of horses, and of little people going riding on them.

Said a man of them to him: “Are you coming with us tonight, Guleesh?”

“I am surely,” said Guleesh.

“If you are, come along,” said the little man, and out they went all together, riding like the wind, faster than the fastest horse ever you saw a-hunting, and faster than the fox and the bounds at his tail.

The cold winter’s wind that was before them, they overtook her, and the cold winter’s wind that was behind them, she did not overtake them. And stop nor stay of that full race, did they make none, until they came to the brink of the sea.

Then every one of them said: ” Hie over cap! Hie over cap I” and that moment they were up in the air, and before Guleesh had time to remember where he was, they were down on dry land again, and were going like the wind. At last they stood still, and a man of them said to Guleesh “Guleesh, do you know where you are now?”

“Not a know,” says Guleesh.

“You’re in France, Guleesh,” said he. “The daughter of the king of France is to be married tonight, the handsomest woman that the sun ever saw, and we must do our best to bring her with us, if we’re only able to carry her off; and you must come with us that we may be able to put the young girl up behind you on the horse, when we’ll be bringing her away, for it’s not lawful for us to put her sitting behind ourselves. But you’re flesh and blood, and she can take a good grip of you, so that she won’t fall off the horse. Are you satisfied, Guleesh, and will you do what we’re telling you?”

“Why shouldn’t I be satisfied?” said Guleesh. ” I’m satisfied, surely, and anything that ye will tell me to do I’ll do it without doubt.”

They got off their horses there, and a man of them said a word that Guleesh did not understand, and on the moment they were lifted up, and Guleesh found himself and his companions in the palace. There was a great feast going on there, and there was not a nobleman or a gentleman in the kingdom but was gathered there, dressed in silk and satin, and gold and silver, and the night was as bright as the day with all the lamps and candles that were lit, and Guleesh had to shut his two eyes at the brightness. When he opened them again and looked from him, he thought he never saw anything as fine as all he saw there. There were a hundred tables spread out, and their full of meat and drink on each table of them, flesh-meat, and cakes and sweetmeats, and wine and ale, and every drink that ever a man saw. The musicians were at the two ends of the hall, and they were playing the sweetest music that ever a man’s ear heard, and there were young women and fine youths in the middle of the hall, dancing and turning, and going round so quickly and so lightly, that it put a soorawn in Guleesh’s head to be looking at them. There were more there playing tricks, and more making fun and laughing, for such a feast as there was that day had not been in France for twenty years, because the old king had no children alive but only the one daughter, and she was to be married to the son of another king that night. Three days the feast was going on, and the third night she was to be married, and that was the night that Guleesh and the sheehogues came, hoping, if they could, to carry off with them the king’s young daughter.

Guleesh and his companions were standing together at the head of the hall, where there was a fine altar dressed up, and two bishops behind it waiting to marry the girl, as soon as the right time should come. Now nobody could see the sheehogues, for they said a word as they came in, that made them all invisible, as if they had not been in it at all.

“Tell me which of them is the king’s daughter,” said Guleesh, when he was becoming a little used to the noise and the light.

“Don’t you see her there away from you?” said the little man that he was talking to.guleesh_rackham

Guleesh looked where the little man was pointing with his finger, and there he saw the loveliest woman that was, he thought, upon the ridge of the world. The rose and the lily were fighting together in her face, and one could not tell which of them got the victory. Her arms and hands were like the lime, her mouth as red as a strawberry when it is ripe, her foot was as small and as light as another one’s hand, her form was smooth and slender, and her hair was falling down from her head in buckles of gold. Her garments and dress were woven with gold and silver, and the bright stone that was in the ring on her hand was as shining as the sun.

Guleesh was nearly blinded with all the loveliness and beauty that was in her; but when he looked again, lie saw that she was crying, and that there was the trace of tears in her eyes. “It can’t be,” said Guleesh, ” that there’s grief on her, when everybody round her is so full of sport and merriment.”

“Musha, then, she is grieved,” said the little man; ” for it’s against her own will she’s marrying, and she has no love for the husband she is to marry. The king was going to give her to him three years ago, when she was only fifteen, but she said she was too young, and requested him to leave her as she was yet. The king gave her a year’s grace, and when that year was up he gave her another year’s grace, and then another; but a week or a day he would not give her longer, and she is eighteen years old tonight, and it’s time for her to marry; but, indeed,” says he, and he crooked his mouth in an ugly way–” iindeed, it’s no king’s son she’ll marry, if I can help it.”

Guleesh pitied the handsome young lady greatly when he heard that, and he was heart-broken to think that it would be necessary for her to marry a man she did not like, or, what was worse, to take a nasty sheehogue for a husband. However, he did not say a word, though he could not help giving many a curse to the ill-luck that was laid out for himself, to be helping the people that were to snatch her away from her home and from her father.

He began thinking, then, what it was he ought to do to save her, but he could think of nothing. “Oh! if I could only give her some help and relief,” said he, “I wouldn’t care whether I were alive or dead; but I see nothing that I can do for her.”

He was looking on when the king’s son came up to her and asked her for a kiss, but she turned her head away from him. Guleesh had double pity for her then, when he saw the lad taking her by the soft white hand, and drawing her out to dance. They went round in the dance near where Guleesh was, and he could plainly see that there were tears in her eyes.

When the dancing was over, the old king, her father, and her mother the queen, came up and said that this was the right time to marry her, that the bishop was ready, and it was time to put the wedding-ring on her and give her to her husband.

The king took the youth by the hand, and the queen took her daughter, and they went up together to the altar, with the lords and great people following them.

When they came near the altar, and were no more than about four yards from it, the little sheehogue stretched out his foot before the girl, and she fell. Before she was able to rise again he threw something that was in his hand upon her, said a couple of words, and upon the moment the maiden was gone from amongst them. Nobody could see her, for that word made her invisible. The little maneen seized her and raised her up behind Guleesh, and the king nor no one else saw them, but out with them through the hall till they came to the door.

Oro! dear Mary! it’s there the pity was, and the trouble, and the crying, and the wonder, and the searching, and the rookawn, when that lady disappeared from their eyes, and without their seeing what did it. Out of the

door of the palace they went, without being stopped or hindered, for nobody saw them, and, “My horse, my bridle, and saddle!” says every man of them. “My horse, my bridle, and saddle!” says Guleesh; and on the moment the horse was standing ready caparisoned before him. “Now, jump up, Guleesh,” said the little man, “and put the lady behind you, and we will be going; the morning is not far off from us now.”

Guleesh raised her up on the horse’s back, and leaped up himself before her, and, “Rise, horse,” said he; and his horse, and the other horses with him, went in a full race until they came to the sea.

“Hie over cap!” said every man of them.

“Hie over cap!” said Guleesh; and on the moment the horse rose under him, and cut a leap in the clouds, and came down in Erin.

They did not stop there, but went of a race to the place where was Guleesh’s house and the rath. And when they came as far as that, Guleesh turned and caught the young girl in his two arms, and leaped off the horse.

“I call and cross you to myself, in the name of God!” said he; and on the spot, before the word was out of his mouth, the horse fell down, and what was in it but the beam of a plough, of which they had made a horse; and every other horse they had, it was that way they made it. Some of them were riding on an old besom, and some on a broken stick, and more on a bohalawn or a hemlock-stalk.

The good people called out together when they heard what Guleesh said:

“Oh! Guleesh, you clown, you thief, that no good may happen you, why did you play that trick on us?”

But they had no power at all to carry off the girl, after Guleesh had consecrated her to himself.

“Oh! Guleesh, isn’t that a nice turn you did us, and we so kind to you? What good have we now out of our journey to France. Never mind yet, you clown, but you’ll pay us another time for this. Believe us, you’ll repent it.”

“He’ll have no good to get out of the young girl,” said the little man that was talking to him in the palace before that, and as he said the word he moved over to her and struck her a slap on the side of the head. “Now,” says he, “she’ll be without talk any more; now, Guleesh, what good will she be to you when she’ll be dumb? It’s time for us to go–but you’ll remember us, Guleesh!”

When he said that he stretched out his two hands, and before Guleesh was able to give an answer, he and the rest of them were gone into the rath out of his sight, and he saw them no more.

He turned to the young woman and said to her: “Thanks be to God, they’re gone. Would you not sooner stay with me than with them?” She gave him no answer. “There’s trouble and grief on her yet,” said Guleesh in his own mind, and he spoke to her again: “I am afraid that you must spend this night in my father’s house, lady, and if there is anything that I can do for you, tell me, and I’ll be your servant.”

The beautiful girl remained silent, but there were tears in her eyes, and her face was white and red after each other.

“Lady,” said Guleesh, “tell me what you would like me to do now. I never belonged at all to that lot of sheehogues who carried you away with them. I am the son of an honest farmer, and I went with them without knowing it. If I’ll be able to send you back to your father I’ll do it, and I pray you make any use of me now that you may wish.”

He looked into her face, and he saw the mouth moving as if she was going to speak, but there came no word from it.

“It cannot be,” said Guleesh, “that you are dumb. Did I not hear you speaking to the king’s son in the palace tonight? Or has that devil made you really dumb, when he struck his nasty hand on your jaw?”

The girl raised her white smooth hand, and laid her finger on her tongue, to show him that she had lost her voice and power of speech, arid the tears ran out of her two eyes like streams, and Guleesh’s own eyes were not dry, for as rough as he was on the outside he had a soft heart, and could not stand the sight of the young girl, and she in that unhappy plight.

He began thinking with himself what he ought to do, and he did not like to bring her home with himself to his father’s house, for he knew well that they would not believe him, that he had been in France and brought back with him the king of France’s daughter, and he was afraid they might make a mock of the young lady or insult her.

As he was doubting what he ought to do, and hesitating, he chanced to remember the priest. “Glory be to God,” said he, “I know now what I’ll do; I’ll bring her to the priest’s house, and he won’t refuse me to keep the lady and care her.” He turned to the lady again and told her that he was loth to take her to his father’s house, but that there was an excellent priest very friendly to himself, who would take good care of her, if she wished to remain in his house; but that if there was any other place she would rather go, he said he would bring her to it.

She bent her head, to show him she was obliged, and gave him to understand that she was ready to follow him any place he was going. “We will go to the priest’s house, then, ” said he; “he is under an obligation to me, and will do anything I ask him.”

They went together accordingly to the priest’s house, and the sun was just rising when they came to the door. Guleesh beat it hard, and as early as it was the priest was up, and opened the door himself. He wondered when he saw Guleesh and the girl, for he was certain that it was coming wanting to be married they were.

“Guleesh, Guleesh, isn’t it the nice boy you are that you can’t wait till ten o’clock or till twelve, but that you must be coming to me at this hour, looking for marriage, you and your sweetheart? You ought to know that I can’t marry you at such a time, or, at all events, can’t marry you lawfully. But ubbubboo!” said he, suddenly, as he looked again at the young girl,” in the name of God, who have you here? Who is she, or how did you get her?”

“Father,” said Guleesh, “you can marry me, or anybody else, if you wish; but it’s not looking for marriage I came to you now, but to ask you, if you please, to give a lodging in your house to this young lady.”

The priest looked at him as though he had ten heads on him; but without putting any other question to him, he desired him to come in, himself and the maiden, and when they came in, he shut the door, brought them into the parlor, and put them sitting.

“Now, Guleesh,” said he, “tell me truly who is this young lady, and whether you’re out of your senses really, or are only making a joke of me.”

“I’m not telling a word of lie, nor making a joke of you,” said Guleesh; “but it was from the palace of the king of France I carried off this lady, and she is the daughter of the king of France.” He began his story then, and told the whole to priest, and the priest was so much surprised that could not help calling out at times, or clapping his hands together.

When Guleesh said from what he saw he thought the girl was not satisfied with the marriage that was going take place in the palace before her and the sheehog broke it up, there came a red blush into the girl’s cheek and he was more certain than ever that she had sooner be as she was–badly as she was–than be the married wife of the man she hated. When Guleesh said that he would be very thankful to the priest if he would keep her in own house, the kind man said he would do that as long as Guleesh pleased, but that he did not know what they ought to do with her, because they had no means of sending back to her father again.

Guleesh answered that he was uneasy about the same thing, and that he saw nothing to do but to keep quiet until they should find some opportunity of doing something better. They made it up then between themselves the priest should let on that it was his brother’s daughter he had, who was come on a visit to him from another county, and that he should tell everybody that she was dumb and do his best to keep every one away from her. They told the young girl what it was they intended to do, she showed by her eyes that she was obliged to them.

Guleesh went home then, and when his people asked him where he had been, he said that he had been asleep at the foot of the ditch, and had passed the night there.

There was great wonderment on the priest’s neighbors at the girl who came so suddenly to his house without any one knowing where she was from, or what business she had there. Some of the people said that everything was not as it ought to be, and others, that Guleesh was not like the same man that was in it before, and that it was a great story, how he was drawing every day to the priest’s house, and that the priest had a wish and a respect for him, a thing they could not clear up at all.

That was true for them, indeed, for it was seldom the day went by but Guleesh would go to the priest’s house, and have a talk with him, and as often as he would come he used to hope to find the young lady well again, and with leave to speak; but, alas! she remained dumb and silent, without relief or cure. Since she had no other means of talking, she carried on a sort of conversation between herself and himself, by moving her hand and fingers, winking her eyes, opening and shutting her mouth, laughing or smiling, and a thousand other signs, so that it was not long until they understood each other very well. Guleesh was always thinking how he should send her back to her father; but there was no one to go with her, and he himself did not know what road to go, for he had never been out of his own country before the night he brought her away with him. Nor had the priest any better knowledge than he; but when Guleesh asked him, he wrote three or four letters to the king of France, and gave them to buyers and sellers of wares, who used to be going from place to place across the sea; but they all went astray, and never a one came to the king’s hand.

This was the way they were for many months, and Guleesh was falling deeper and deeper in love with her every day, and it was plain to himself and the priest that she liked him. The boy feared greatly at last, lest the king should really hear where his daughter was, and take her back from himself, and he besought the priest to write no more, but to leave the matter to God.

So they passed the time for a year, until there came a day when Guleesh was lying by himself on the grass, on the last day of the last month in autumn, and he was thinking over again in his own mind of everything that happened to him from the day that he went with the sheehogues across the sea. He remembered then, suddenly, that it was one November night that he was standing at the gable of the house, when the whirlwind came, and the sheehogues in it, and he said to himself: “We have November night again to-day, and I’ll stand in the same place I was last year, until I see if the good people come again. Perhaps I might see or hear something that would be useful to me, and might bring back her talk again to Mary “–that was the name himself and the priest called the king’s daughter, for neither of them knew her right name. He told his intention to the priest, and the priest gave him his blessing.

Guleesh accordingly went to the old rath when the night was darkening, and he stood with his bent elbow leaning on a grey old flag, waiting till the middle of the night should come. The moon rose slowly, and it was like a knob of fire behind him; and there was a white fog which was raised up over the fields of grass and all damp places, through the coolness of the night after a great heat in the day. The night was calm as is a lake when there is not a breath of wind to move a wave on it, and there was no sound to be heard but the cronawn of the insects that would go by from time to time, or the hoarse sudden scream of the wild-geese, as they passed from lake to lake, half a mile up in the air over his head; or the sharp whistle of the golden and green plover, rising and lying, lying and rising, as they do on a calm night. There were a thousand thousand bright stars shining over his head, and there was a little frost out, which left the grass under his foot white and crisp.

He stood there for an hour, for two hours, for three hours, and the frost increased greatly, so that he heard the breaking of the traneens under his foot as often as he moved. He was thinking, in his own mind, at last, that the sheehogues would not come that night, and that it was as good for him to return back again, when he heard a sound far away from him, coming towards him, and he recognised what it was at the first moment. The sound increased, and at first it was like the beating of waves on a stony shore, and then it was like the falling of a great waterfall, and at last it was like a loud storm in the tops of the trees, and then the whirlwind burst into the rath of one rout, and the sheehogues were in it.

It all went by him so suddenly that he lost his breath with it, but he came to himself on the spot, and put an ear on himself, listening to what they would say.

Scarcely had they gathered into the rath till they all began shouting, and screaming, and talking amongst themselves; and then each one of them cried out: “My horse, and bridle, and saddle! My horse, and bridle, and saddle!” and Guleesh took courage, and called out as loudly as any of them: “My horse, and bridle, and saddle! My horse, and bridle, and saddle!” But before the word was well out of his mouth, another man cried out: “Ora! Guleesh, my boy, are you here with us again? How are you getting on with your woman? There’s no use in your calling for your horse tonight. I’ll go bail you won’t play such a trick on us again. It was a good trick you played on us last year?”

“It was,” said another man; “he won’t do it again.”

“Isn’t he a prime lad, the same lad! to take a woman with him that never said as much to him as, ‘How do you do?’ since this time last year!” says the third man.

“Perhaps he likes to be looking at her,” said another voice.

“And if the omadawn only knew that there’s an herb growing up by his own door, and if he were to boil it and give it to her, she’d be well,” said another voice.

“That’s true for you.”

“He is an omadawn.”

“Don’t bother your head with him; we’ll be going.”

“We’ll leave the bodach as he is.”

And with that they rose up into the air, and out with them with one roolya-boolya the way they came; and they left poor Guleesh standing where they found him, and the two eyes going out of his head, looking after them and wondering.

He did not stand long till he returned back, and he thinking in his own mind on all he saw and heard, and wondering whether there was really an herb at his own door that would bring back the talk to the king’s daughter. “It can’t be,” says he to himself, “that they would tell it to me, if there was any virtue in it; but perhaps the sheehogue didn’t observe himself when he let the word slip out of his mouth. I’ll search well as soon as the sun rises, whether there’s any plant growing beside the house except thistles and dockings.”

He went home, and as tired as he was he did not sleep a wink until the sun rose on the morrow. He got up then, and it was the first thing he did to go out and search

well through the grass round about the house, trying could he get any herb that he did not recognize. And, indeed, he was not long searching till he observed a large strange herb that was growing up just by the gable of the house.

He went over to it, and observed it closely, and saw that there were seven little branches coming out of the stalk, and seven leaves growing on every brancheen of them and that there was a white sap in the leaves. “It’s very wonderful,” said he to himself, “that I never noticed this herb before. If there’s any virtue in an herb at all, it ought to be in such a strange one as this.”

He drew out his knife, cut the plant, and carried it into his own house; stripped the leaves off it and cut up the stalk; and there came a thick, white juice out of it, as there comes out of the sow-thistle when it is bruised, except that the juice was more like oil.

He put it in a little pot and a little water in it, and laid it on the fire until the water was boiling, and then he took a cup, filled it half up with the juice, and put it to his own mouth. It came into his head then that perhaps it was poison that was in it, and that the good people were only tempting him that he might kill himself with that trick, or put the girl to death without meaning it. He put down the cup again, raised a couple of drops on the top of his finger, and put it to his mouth. It was not bitter, and, indeed, had a sweet, agreeable taste. He grew bolder then, and drank the full of a thimble of it, and then as much again, and he never stopped till he had half the cup drunk. He fell asleep after that, and did not wake till it was night, and there was great hunger and great thirst on him.

He had to wait, then, till the day rose; but he determined, as soon as he should wake in the morning, that he would go to the king’s daughter and give her a drink of the juice of the herb.

As soon as he got up in the morning, he went over to the priest’s house with the drink in his hand, and he never felt himself so bold and valiant, and spirited and light, as he was that day, and he was quite certain that it was the drink he drank which made him so hearty.

When he came to the house, he found the priest and the young lady within, and they were wondering greatly why he had not visited them for two days.

He told them all his news, and said that he was certain that there was great power in that herb, and that it would do the lady no hurt, for he tried it himself and got good from it, and then he made her taste it, for he vowed and swore that there was no harm in it.

Guleesh handed her the cup, and she drank half of it, and then fell back on her bed and a heavy sleep came on her, and she never woke out of that sleep till the day on the morrow.

Guleesh and the priest sat up the entire night with her, waiting till she should awake, and they between hope and unhope, between expectation of saving her and fear of hurting her.

She awoke at last when the sun had gone half its way through the heavens. She rubbed her eyes and looked like a person who did not know where she was. She was like one astonished when she saw Guleesh and the priest in the same room with her, and she sat up doing her best to collect her thoughts.

The two men were in great anxiety waiting to see would she speak, or would she not speak, and when they remained silent for a couple of minutes, the priest said to her:

“Did you sleep well, Mary?”

And she answered him: “I slept, thank you.”

No sooner did Guleesh hear her talking than he put a shout of joy out of him, and ran over to her and fell on his two knees, and said: “A thousand thanks to God, who has given you back the talk; lady of my heart, speak again to me.”

The lady answered him that she understood it was he who boiled that drink for her, and gave it to her; that she was obliged to him from her heart for all the kindness he showed her since the day she first came to Ireland, and that he might be certain that she never would forget it.

Guleesh was ready to die with satisfaction and delight. Then they brought her food, and she ate with a good appetite, and was merry and joyous, and never left off talking with the priest while she was eating.

After that Guleesh went home to his house, and stretched himself on the bed and fell asleep again, for the force of the herb was not all spent, and he passed another day and a night sleeping. When he woke up he went back to the priest’s house, and found that the young lady was in the same state, and that she was asleep almost since the time that he left the house.

guleesh

He went into her chamber with the priest, and they remained watching beside her till she awoke the second time, and she had her talk as well as ever, and Guleesh was greatly rejoiced. The priest put food on the table again, and they ate together, and Guleesh used after that to come to the house from day to day, and the friendship that was between him and the king’s daughter increased, because she had no one to speak to except Guleesh and the priest, and she liked Guleesh best.

So they married one another, and that was the fine wedding they had, and if I were to be there then, I would not be here now; but I heard it from a birdeen that there was neither cark nor care, sickness nor sorrow, mishap nor misfortune on them till the hour of their death, and may the same be with me, and with us all!

Beltane lore vid


Come and celebrate with us on this joyous day! Come Dance round the bonfire and maypole! Come be joyful and merry! Come drink and be of good cheer! It is Beltane, Spring is here, it is time to celebrate!